1
1

press to zoom
2
2

press to zoom
16
16

press to zoom
1
1

press to zoom
1/16

Urban Research 

Wastewater Ecology, Buffalo 

Until now, industrial, urban and population growth have created cities where natural processes are replaced by human-made necessary improvements. Pushing nature out of our megacities has led to crisis and lack of natural elements, air, and water, that are essential for human survival, along with other living species.

Looking at the daily Water Resource Demands, average daily US water consumption is 88 gallons per person. Considering the next 100 million will need 8.8 billion gallons of water per day if current consumption patterns continue. Ground-water the withdrawal rate is in millions of gallons per day. Similar to streams and lakes, wetlands can receive ground-water inflow, recharge groundwater.

This project focuses on water contamination happening around the Buffalo River and Harbor from decades.

Wetlands, once perceived as worthless land, are now recognized as a necessary component of a vital landscape. They are often considered the “kidneys of the landscape” because of their role in mitigating and filtering the effects of human activity on water resources in the watershed. Wetland functions have been shown to include storm and floodwater retention, shoreline protection, water-quality improvement & also provides wildlife habitat.

The extensive water management will be on display for the public to view and interact with in order to bring attention to the infrastructure that is prominent for the function of a society that has been overlooked for much of its time.

Our project aims to decentralize the wastewater treatment infrastructure that currently exists in Buffalo and create a scattered and natural filtration system that will be on display for the public to view and interact with, bringing attention to such a crucial part of the function of society, that is often overlooked. Located on the outer harbor of Buffalo, will be the first phase of tapping and redirecting the existing CSOs. The site is an environmental wasteland, created through its history of industrialization leaving behind abandoned buildings, brownfields, landfills, and inactive hazardous waste. We not only strive to provide filtration across this site and work towards a greener future, and revitalization of habitats, but we also intend to embrace the existing landscape and its history.

M.Arch 

M.Arch 

Buffalo 

Spring 2020